Ogura Martial Arts Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Program

Hi and welcome to Ogura Martial Arts Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Program.  I am delighted you have decided to train with us.  My name is Jason Williard and I am the Head Instructor for the Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Program.  A little info about my background first.  I started training in the martial arts in 1991 under Master Ken Mills and Grandmaster Kiel Soon Parks in Tae Kwon Do. I eventually earned a 4th Dan in Tae Kwon Do.  I then trained with various other instructors earning black belts in three other arts and a Senior Student rank in Jun Fan Jeet Kune Do.  In 2003 I met my Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu instructor Eduardo Barros.  Eduardo is a black belt under Andre Pederneiras and represents team Novia Uniao.  I was awarded my Blue Belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu in 2004, Purple Belt in 2006, and Brown Belt in 2011. I also trained under Pedro Sauer black belt Bill Jones. I have had the great fortune to train with some of the world’s best Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu athletes such as Andre Pederneiras, Robson Moura, Renato “Charuto” Verissimo, Mario Sperry, and Vitor “Shaolin” Ribeiro.

A little history of Brazilian Jui-Jitsu

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu or Gracie Jui-Jitsu was developed in the 1920’s by Helio Gracie who learned Traditional Japanese Jiu-Jitsu from his brother Carlos Gracie.  Helio Gracie being small and frail adapted the techniques he learned from his brother to from the roots of what is modern day Brazilian or Gracie Jiu-Jitsu.  Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu came to the United States in the 1980’s but did not become popular until 1993.  The first UFC (Ultimate Fighting Championship) aired in 1993 and was dominated by a little skinny Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu fighter named Royce Grace (Son of Helio Gracie).  Royce went on to win 3 of the first 4 UFC’s and the Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu craze exploded. Brazilian or Gracie Jiu-Jitsu is one of the most popular and practiced martial arts in the world today, as well as being one of the most effective.  The Ogura Martial Arts Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu program will focus on all aspects of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu which includes Throws/Takedowns, Self-Defense, and Ground Fighting.

Thank You for training with us!!!  See you on the mats!!!

Ogura Martial Arts Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Program

Rank Structure and Promotions

The Rank Structure of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is informal and varies from school to school.  The Ogura Martial Arts Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu program will use the more traditional Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu rank structure.  Some schools and Associations have added a number of belts, particularly in the youth ranks.  This is done for various reasons. The Ogura Martial Arts Program will not use these extra ranks. There are separate ranks for youth (ages 8 thru 15) and adult (16 and up) students.  The youth rank structure is as follows: White Belt, Yellow Belt, Orange Belt, and Green Belt.  The adult rank structure goes: White Belt, Blue Belt, Purple Belt, Brown Belt, and Black Belt.  Each belt (Youth & Adult) also has four stripes for each belt before the student is promoted to the next rank.  There are minimum time and age limits on some of the ranks, and they will be strictly adhered to.  Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu differs from most other martial arts that there are no formal promotions.  Although some schools have adapted a more “Americanized” way of formal promotions, the Ogura Martial Arts Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu program will not have formal promotions for belts or stripes.  When the instructor feels the student is ready for a stripe or belt they will promote the student as long as they have obtained the minimum requirements.  Ranking in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu takes a long time often with the student being at a belt for years before promoting to the next rank.  Here is a breakdown of the ranks, the stripes and the minimum requirements for each.


   Youth Ranks: (Ages 8 thru 15)

    White Belt:                                                                      Yellow Belt:

    1st Stripe: 1 month                                                          1st Stripe: 1 month from last promotion

    2nd Stripe: 2 months from last promotion                       2nd Stripe: 2 months from last promotion

    3rd Stripe: 3 months from last promotion                        3rd Stripe: 3 months from last promotion

    4th Stripe: 4 months from last promotion                        4th Stripe: 4 months from last promotion

 

   Orange Belt: (Minimum age: 10 yrs old)                             Green Belt (Minimum age: 13 years old)

   1st Stripe: 2 months from last promotion                           1st Stripe: 3 months from last promotion

   2nd Stripe: 4 months from last promotion                          2nd Stripe: 6 months from last promotion

   3rd Stripe: 6 months from last promotion                           3rd Stripe: 9 months from last promotion

   4th Stripe: 8 months from last promotion                           4th Stripe: 12 months from last promotion
 

Once a youth student reaches age 16 they then transition into the adult ranks.  They will not have to start over at white belt.  The next belt they would attain would be Blue Belt.

 Adult Ranks: (Ages 16 and Up)


   White Belt                                                                          Blue Belt: (Minimum age: 16 yrs old)

   1st Stripe: 2 months                                                          1st Stripe: 4 months from last promotion

   2nd Stripe: 4 months from last promotion                         2nd Stripe: 8 months from last promotion

   3rd Stripe: 6 months from last promotion                          3rd Stripe: 12 months from last promotion

   4th Stripe: 12 months from last promotion                        4th Stripe: 16 months from last promotion

 

   Purple Belt: (Minimum age: 17 yrs old)                        Brown Belt: (Minimum age: 18 yrs old)                

   1st Stripe: 4 months from last promotion                           1st Stripe: 5 months from last promotion

   2nd Stripe: 8 months from last promotion                          2nd Stripe: 10 months from last promotion

   3rd Stripe: 12 months from last promotion                         3rd Stripe: 15 months from last promotion

   4th Stripe: 16 months from last promotion                         4th Stripe: 20 months from last promotion

 

Remember these time frames are only minimums.  The instructor decides when a student has reached the proficiency for the corresponding stripe or belt. 

Ogura Martial Arts Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Program

 

Rolling/Sparring Rules:

1) Each match will begin and end with a hand shake or fist bump.

2) When tapping make sure you tap on your opponent. If you can’t tap your partner, tap the mat with your hand or foot, or say “Tap”.

3) When you partner “Taps” in any fashion you must stop. Failure to stop will result in the offending party being removed from class.  If the situation is serious or happens repeatedly, the offending party will be removed from the school.

4) No cranking on any submissions.

5) All matches will start from a kneeling or seated position, unless we are working takedowns.  No matches will start standing unless under the supervision of an instructor.

The Following Techniques are NOT PERMITTED when Rolling/Sparring, unless otherwise noted.

No slamming from the Guard position.
No Heel Hooks or twisting leg locks. (No youths, only adult advanced students)
No Neck Cranks, Cervical Locks, or any techniques that twist the neck or spine in an unnatural way.
Grinding forearm or elbow across the face or head. (Cross face is allowed for adult advanced)
Small Joint manipulation, i.e. pulling or twisting fingers or toes. (Adult advanced may use wrist locks.)

Ogura Martial Arts Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu Program

Rules/Etiquette:

1)  Leave pride and ego at home.  Come with an open mind to train and learn.                         

2)  No shoes on the mats.

3)  If you leave the mats to use restrooms, must put on shoes or flip-flops.  If you use the restrooms with bare feet you will not be allowed back on the mats.

4)  Must wear approved BJJ or Judo Gi and correct BJJ belt. No “karate” Gis or just t-shirt and “karate” pants.

5)  T-shirt or rash guard must be worn under Gi top.

6)  Gi must be kept clean and in good repair.  Wash after every class.

7)  Must keep finger and toe nails neat and trimmed and practice good general hygiene.

9)  Long hair must be kept out of face and pulled back.

10) No horse play.  No rolling/sparring before or after class without instructor supervision.

11) We will bow to each other before we begin class and at the end of class.

12) Keep talking to a minimum.

13) No foul language or poor sportsmanship.

14) When the instructor is teaching the technique, everyone must sit down.  No leaning on the walls.

15) Continue to drill the techniques until the instructor tells you to stop.

16) Do not work on techniques other than the ones being taught. There will be time at the end of class for this during rolling/sparring.

17) Always be polite and respectful to everyone in the academy.

18) Do not train with open wounds.  Must cover with tape.  Band Aids will not work and come off to easy.

19) If you are sick, please stay home.

20) Do not train if you have ringworm or staph until you are medically cleared by a doctor.

21) If you have to leave early or are going to be late, please let the instructor know ahead of time.

22) DO NOT ask the instructor when you are going to be promoted or receive a stripe.  The belts and stripes will come.  Focus on training and learning

These rules are for everyone at the academy, which includes students, instructors, parents, and other guests.Type your paragraph here.